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Written by Puff Staff

Wednesday, 24 July 2013

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Connecticut

Connecticut wrappers are quite common.  They’re shade-grown in the United States or Ecuador from Connecticut Seed.  Shade-grown means they are grown underneath the shade provided by huge sheets of cheesecloth.  By shading the leaves from intense sunlight, a milder flavor is achieved.  Some of the notes associated with Connecticut wrappers include butter, cedar, cream, coffee, grass, and pepper.  Their aroma tends to be spicy.

Natural

Natural aka English Market Selection wrappers are usually a bit darker than their Connecticut counterparts.  The darker color results from not being shade-grown in certain instances and being picked further along in the maturity process.  The English Market Selection description is sometimes used to label their quality for the UK.  Natural notes include bread, cedar, coffee, spice, and sweetness.

Medium Shades

Criollo

Criollo is Spanish for “native” and that term describes this type of leaf perfectly since its use can be traced back to the 1400’s.  Criollo wrappers can still pack a punch, but not as much as Corojo wrappers that will be discussed shortly.  Bread, cedar, cocoa, nuts, pepper, and sweetness are some of the notes you can expect.

Sumatra

Sumatra tobacco is named after Indonesian island of Sumatra where it first originated.  A lot of it now comes to us via Ecuador and Honduras.  Sumatra wrappers are sweeter and can offer up floral notes, as well as cinnamon and earth.

Corojo

Corojo leaves typically come from Honduras now, but they used to originate in Cuba until the 1970’s.  Corojo wrappers can be spotted by their reddish-brown tint.  They’re also pretty oily.  Not intended for the faint at heart, these result in full-bodied smokes with a spicy kick.  Notes include black pepper, cedar, cocoa, earth, and leather.

Habano

It’s a rather safe bet to call these not only the darkest of the medium shades, but also the spiciest.  In fact, their spiciness can rival that of a Cuban cigar.  This isn’t too surprising when you consider the fact that they’re often grown from Cuban seed.  Like Corojos, Habanos are really intended for experienced smokers looking for something that packs a spicy punch.  Bread, cedar, cocoa, espresso, and leather are some of the flavors you might experience.






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