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Keurig question

This is a discussion on Keurig question within the Coffee Discussion forums, part of the Coffee Forums category; Hello to all. I had purchased a keurig machine about six years ago and used it to death until it ...

  
  1. #1

    At last I can relax veteranvmb's Avatar


     

    Keurig question

    Hello to all. I had purchased a keurig machine about six years ago and used it to death until it gave up the ghost about six months ago. It was the one that only had two sizes to brew and it wad wonderful. I think it was the k40 or k60. I don't remember. I used the dark magic and double black diamond and it made a nice strong cup of joe.
    Well I tried about three other of the newer keurigs and the coffee was weak,even at the smallest settings. 5 ounces.
    When I compared how long the new machines took to fill the 9.5 ounce setting, I observed the new machines finished the water dispersal almost eight seconds quicker, leaving not enough time to fully envelop the grounds.
    I am disappointed and have gone back to mr coffee drip and french press,using pets beans. For my espresso, I am using two illy i espresso machines,which I enjoy very much. I use the dark roast.
    Any comments? I did like the conveinance of the keurig, but to me the coffee tastes like dishwater.
    Much regards jerry

  2. #2

    Full grown Puffer Fish Blue Raccoon's Avatar


     

    Re: Keurig question

    I replaced a worn out Keurig with a Nespresso. imo, the coffee and espresso is quite good.

  3. #3

    Puffer Fish with many spikes Sp@rky426's Avatar


     

    Re: Keurig question

    I always brew kurieg on small cup setting. If that matters. But I prefer hand grinding beans and using my French press.

  4. #4

    Full grown Puffer Fish Blue Raccoon's Avatar


     

    Re: Keurig question

    I generally use the refillable coffee pod thing with my own fresh ground coffee at least for myself.

  5. #5

    Leading Puffer Fish Trackmyer's Avatar


     

    Re: Keurig question

    Two things that do not go together are Good Coffee, and Keurig.

    Here's a not so brief back story on Keurig and the coffee market.

    Keurig is designed to produce a fast cup of coffee, and to allow the user to not have the waste brought on by brewing a conventional pot and only drinking a cup or two.

    The typical commercial coffee brewer brews water over grounds at aprox. 190-195*f. With a brew time ranging from 3-5 minutes depending on make/model. Whenever coffee is being brewed the user waits till the end to enjoy a cup. This allows the weaker starting coffee to mix with the darker middle of the cycle coffee that comes out after the beans are fully saturated. Within the last decade most leading manufacturer's have copied Fetco with their pre-wet cycle and pulse brewing. This allows water to cover the grounds then after a 30 second delay begin the brew cycle.

    The pulse brew is a way of brewing hot water over grounds then pausing to allow evacuation of coffee from the filter cone then beginning the next pulse and will continue until the end of the brew. It has increased the total brew time but produces a much better end product. Green Mountain coffee roasters (GMCR) was one of the first major coffee manufacturers in the US to begin solely using Fetco because they were the only ones at the time with this technology. At the time they were all about a "Quality" cup of coffee.

    They also were one of the only folks offering their coffee in Keurig B2000 commercial single serve units for offices, gyms, etc.

    Then Keurig started gaining speed in the market. With home models being made some years after the B2000 was introduced. With the huge increase in demand of the home models, GMCR purchased Keurig and had a major shift in their business model to focus heavily on the single serve market. With the initial vision of quality overpowered by the $'s of fast and cheap, their entire company changed for, in my opinion, the worse.

    Keurig was, and still is designed for a fast cup, but not a great cup of coffee. With its fast dispense of hot water thru the k-cup your coffee grounds are just starting to have a decent extraction by the time the cycle is complete. Sure it can make a decent cup depending on the coffee used. But you can paint a wonderful paint job on a donkey, and it's still a donkey. If you want to see how weak your Keurig really brews I offer the same advice I offer to any of my clients. Brew a cup into a clear glass vessel, and look how clear it is. It has the appearance of tea water, not coffee. Espresso can achieve fast extraction because it uses heat and pressure, not heat alone.

    As to your "pets coffee", I haven't heard of it. If you meant Peet's coffee, I have, and thru doing some work with them I have become very impressed with how they operate. They remind me of a young GMCR. And illy coffee, well, as far as espresso is concerned, they make one of the best espresso beans I have worked with. Not to mention, their 6.61lb. Vacuum sealed cans are impressive in their own right. Ensuring freshness like no other container I have encountered (it did take a bit figuring out I had to relieve the pressure to open).

    I know, too much yapping. So in conclusion, if you want quality coffee go with the following.

    For a pot of coffee, invest in a Bunn VP17 pour over unit. (You won't get the pulse brew, but at least the majority of minerals will be cooked out of your water). Then toss the toy Mr. Coffee in the dump.
    Use a French press for single or two cup servings.
    Stick with your espresso machine for a good demitasse of espresso

    Heh, you asked for comments.

  6. #6

    At last I can relax veteranvmb's Avatar


     

    Re: Keurig question

    Thanks Trackmyer for your considerable time in your response. Problem, is that while the keurig doesnt make a great cup, my original made a good enough cup, because the water dispersal was slower. I am now starting to extend my illy shots to four ounces and using it as a short coffee. LOL
    The little 4 cup Mr coffee gets decent reviews, even over a lot of pricier machines. And yes I meant Peets coffee, not pets. LOL I find it to be a consistently well roasted coffee. They know what they are doing.
    Much regards jerry

  7. #7

    Puff Contest Czar MDSPHOTO's Avatar


     

    Re: Keurig question

    Kudos to Track for imparting coffee wisdom to the Puff community! I am a daily Peet's drinker as their coffees are amazingly rich without being over roasted like Starbucks. Were I lucky enough to have a Peet's store near me I would be there every morning for my cup of stimulation. If you go to their shops they have open brewing areas with mirrors so you can see the pour over on the ground coffee which is quite impressive.

  8. #8

    Full grown Puffer Fish


     

    Re: Keurig question

    I am the sole coffee drinker in my house, and have used a 4-cup KitchenAid cone-basket drip coffee maker for years and years. It makes a great cup of coffee, but doesn't take long because of the low volume. They don't sell my machine any longer, and when I wanted one for our RV, I had to resort to buying a used one on Amazon or eBay.
    Forced to find a new home when Puff went dark 1-30-15. Now at Cigar Bum.

  9. #9

    Dumb Fish 04EDGE40's Avatar


     

    Re: Keurig question

    Quote Originally Posted by Trackmyer View Post
    Two things that do not go together are Good Coffee, and Keurig.

    Here's a not so brief back story on Keurig and the coffee market.

    Keurig is designed to produce a fast cup of coffee, and to allow the user to not have the waste brought on by brewing a conventional pot and only drinking a cup or two.

    The typical commercial coffee brewer brews water over grounds at aprox. 190-195*f. With a brew time ranging from 3-5 minutes depending on make/model. Whenever coffee is being brewed the user waits till the end to enjoy a cup. This allows the weaker starting coffee to mix with the darker middle of the cycle coffee that comes out after the beans are fully saturated. Within the last decade most leading manufacturer's have copied Fetco with their pre-wet cycle and pulse brewing. This allows water to cover the grounds then after a 30 second delay begin the brew cycle.

    The pulse brew is a way of brewing hot water over grounds then pausing to allow evacuation of coffee from the filter cone then beginning the next pulse and will continue until the end of the brew. It has increased the total brew time but produces a much better end product. Green Mountain coffee roasters (GMCR) was one of the first major coffee manufacturers in the US to begin solely using Fetco because they were the only ones at the time with this technology. At the time they were all about a "Quality" cup of coffee.

    They also were one of the only folks offering their coffee in Keurig B2000 commercial single serve units for offices, gyms, etc.

    Then Keurig started gaining speed in the market. With home models being made some years after the B2000 was introduced. With the huge increase in demand of the home models, GMCR purchased Keurig and had a major shift in their business model to focus heavily on the single serve market. With the initial vision of quality overpowered by the $'s of fast and cheap, their entire company changed for, in my opinion, the worse.

    Keurig was, and still is designed for a fast cup, but not a great cup of coffee. With its fast dispense of hot water thru the k-cup your coffee grounds are just starting to have a decent extraction by the time the cycle is complete. Sure it can make a decent cup depending on the coffee used. But you can paint a wonderful paint job on a donkey, and it's still a donkey. If you want to see how weak your Keurig really brews I offer the same advice I offer to any of my clients. Brew a cup into a clear glass vessel, and look how clear it is. It has the appearance of tea water, not coffee. Espresso can achieve fast extraction because it uses heat and pressure, not heat alone.

    As to your "pets coffee", I haven't heard of it. If you meant Peet's coffee, I have, and thru doing some work with them I have become very impressed with how they operate. They remind me of a young GMCR. And illy coffee, well, as far as espresso is concerned, they make one of the best espresso beans I have worked with. Not to mention, their 6.61lb. Vacuum sealed cans are impressive in their own right. Ensuring freshness like no other container I have encountered (it did take a bit figuring out I had to relieve the pressure to open).

    I know, too much yapping. So in conclusion, if you want quality coffee go with the following.

    For a pot of coffee, invest in a Bunn VP17 pour over unit. (You won't get the pulse brew, but at least the majority of minerals will be cooked out of your water). Then toss the toy Mr. Coffee in the dump.
    Use a French press for single or two cup servings.
    Stick with your espresso machine for a good demitasse of espresso

    Heh, you asked for comments.
    In general I think this is great advice. But I want to stand as the Keurig apologist here and say "you get what you pay for."

    I am a coffee fanatic. I switch between a Moka pot, espresso maker, a pour-over, a french press, and finally... my Keurig.

    I think the lower end Keurigs (which are still over-priced) make an "alright" cup of coffee. It's good for a quick cup on the go, and that's about it. However, since switching to the B150/K150 I have changed my stance.

    This coffee maker makes a terrific cup of coffee. It has plenty of settings, including water temperature and about 5 or 6 cups sizes, and brews quite a bit slower than my old B40 did.

    The coffee that comes out of this machine is rich and dark, definitely not tea-colored. I can actually make 10 oz cups with many cups and still get a full and rich cup of coffee.

    So while I think the lower end Keurigs have given the company a bad name (and the new 2.0, which is a blatant money grab), the higher-end machines hold up their end of the bargain.
    Everything I say should be read in a sarcastic manner first. If the sarcasm makes no sense, read it as if I'm drunk.

  10. #10

    Leading Puffer Fish Trackmyer's Avatar


     

    Re: Keurig question

    Quote Originally Posted by 04EDGE40 View Post
    In general I think this is great advice. But I want to stand as the Keurig apologist here and say "you get what you pay for."

    I am a coffee fanatic. I switch between a Moka pot, espresso maker, a pour-over, a french press, and finally... my Keurig.

    I think the lower end Keurigs (which are still over-priced) make an "alright" cup of coffee. It's good for a quick cup on the go, and that's about it. However, since switching to the B150/K150 I have changed my stance.

    This coffee maker makes a terrific cup of coffee. It has plenty of settings, including water temperature and about 5 or 6 cups sizes, and brews quite a bit slower than my old B40 did.

    The coffee that comes out of this machine is rich and dark, definitely not tea-colored. I can actually make 10 oz cups with many cups and still get a full and rich cup of coffee.

    So while I think the lower end Keurigs have given the company a bad name (and the new 2.0, which is a blatant money grab), the higher-end machines hold up their end of the bargain.
    My wife loves the Keurig as well. I have two commercial models the B150, and the B200. Since she is not a purist by any means with all the sugar and creamer used. She has no issues with Keurig at all.
    The brew time increase with the B150 is due to the cup size options, in relation to the internal heater tank. When you choose your cup size and you here the first set of "buzzing" noise,that is the tank overfilling to your desired cup size. Then the pause, then the transfer of water to the brewing chamber. Your water over grounds time is the same though since as soon as your lid is closed the cup is punctured and any water coming into the cup will start coming out. The last little burst of steam with noise is basically a little fish tank style air pump used to purge the lines to help prevent blockage.

    The Keurig has and continues to be a huge selling coffee machine in quantity. To be honest, a lot of us i the field thought it was a fad that would blow over in a couple years. However, just the opposite. Once GMCR exclusive rights to the Kcup design expired, Dunkin, Timothy's, and about every other coffee manufacturer jumped in to get their hands on their piece of the pie. The result is so many varieties and choices from coffee's to teas to cocoa's. This is alluring to people who like variety from cup to cup, as well as families where one member may like DarkRoast while the other likes Tea. With the ease of operation, the speed of brew time, and the elimination of waste, it's a great design and unit. The hardcore coffee purists though will shoot this down on sight. Then again, most purists I deal with use Espresso machines or French Press only, and wouldn't ever consider consuming a bean that wasn't freshly ground, properly stored, and having a big fancy name associated with it. Once you get into single origin vs. blend it's about the same as discussions on the best cigar on the market. It gets real muddy, real quick.
    Happy Holidays brother, and drink a cup for me.

  11. #11

    Puffer Fish with some spikes Bowtech4ever's Avatar


     

    Re: Keurig question

    Bialetti Brikka 4 cup mocha pot. I like Cuban style coffee, and a Cuban friend of mine swears by, and recommended it hands down. He even travels with his & a mini hot plate. I got one shortly after, and could not be happier. Sure it takes a little longer, but the wait is worth it. It's either that for Cuban or my French press for the rest. On the run or traveling.....I take what I can get, and deal with it.
    I Wish I Was Half The Man My Dog Has Already Decided I Am


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