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RUM

This is a discussion on RUM within the Food, Wine, & Spirits Forum forums, part of the Non Cigar Related Specialty Forums category; Originally Posted by Milhouse im not a big rum guy. i like brugal extra viejo. i recently had a swig ...

  
  1. #46

    Evolving Lead Puffer Fish edwardsdigital's Avatar


     

    Re: RUM

    Quote Originally Posted by Milhouse View Post
    im not a big rum guy. i like brugal extra viejo.

    i recently had a swig of that black seal but it was at 8:00am on a fishing trip. I would like to revisit.
    Nothing better than getting started early while on a fishing trip!!

  2. #47

    Puffer Fish with some spikes Simon.G's Avatar


     

    Re: RUM

    Ron Zacapa is a Beautiful sipping Rum...
    Sailor Jerry is my other favourite mixed...

  3. #48

    Newbie in the ocean


     

    Re: RUM

    According to my knowledge all of wine like wisckey,Rum, and champion wines the RUM is the best forever!

  4. #49

    Full grown Puffer Fish Horsefeathers's Avatar


     

    Re: RUM

    A user (Kenning) posted a terrific write up on RUM from another forum I visit (Something Awful). I don't want to take credit for someone else's hard work, so just to be clear this NOT written by me. I'm just passing along the info since I came across this thread, and he did such a great write up.


    "There's naught, no doubt, so much the spirit calms as rum and true religion." - Lord Byron

    "The chief fudling they make in the island is Rumbullion, alias Kill-Devil, and this is made of sugar canes distilled, a hot, hellish and terrible liquor." - John Lingon, an English settler in Barbados


    Rum
    Sweet nectar of the cane. Rum is the world's most varied spirit, and perhaps the world's most poorly-understood. All spirits have some sort of customary and legal requirements, which are more or less stringent. Bourbon, on the one hand, is definitely more. Gin is less. Rum is much, much less. To be labeled "rum" – in the United States at least – all that is required is that the spirit be derived from the sugarcane, a tall, fibrous species of grass originally from South and Southeast Asia. The sweet juice is pressed from the cane, and then either fermented directly or processed to produce molasses, which is then itself fermented. The production of molasses also yields an unimportant byproduct. After the appropriate fermentation, this sweet, beerish liquid is distilled, filtered, possibly aged in wood, and then bottled for sale.

    The entire process is up to the discretion of the distiller, from the base material (French-speaking islands and Brazil like the juice, most everyone else does molasses), the fermenting agent (Cuban-style rums tend to use faster-acting, cleaner-tasting yeast, while Jamaicans employ a sort of sour mash process, using the old, slow-acting yeast from the last batch to get those rich funky flavors – in Indonesia they start fermenting their batavia arrack with some old rice cakes), to the sort of still (both pot stills and patent stills are used), to the distillation proof, to the length of aging and the sort of barrels, to the bottling proof. All of these variables and more combine to produce an almost infinite variety in rum styles and flavor profiles, to the point that it's essentially impossible to say what rum tastes like (besides delicious).

    So how do you know what to drink? There's no one satisfactory system. I used to think of rum in terms of dark, gold, and light, which is actually a hilariously incomplete and misleading organizational system. You also need to know whether it is cane juice or molasses rum (also known as rhum agricole and rhum industriel respectively). The sort of still is significant, since a pot still will retain more of the flavor of the base ingredients than will a patent/column/Coffey still. And of course age is important, since it has an impact on the mellowness and roundness of a spirit.

    Rums will usually list some, but rarely all, of this information on their label. There is one crucial piece of information which is pretty much always readily available though: the region in which the rum is produced. While regional styles aren't quite as well-defined as they were, say, 70 years ago (a global market has somewhat flattened and homogenized rum production, especially high-volume rums), they're still the best key to having a reasonable estimate of what you'll be drinking. The broadest-possible division is one of language.

    Spanish-speaking regions generally use molasses and tend to use patent stills and short fermentation times for a clean, crisp flavor. Light rums from these regions tend to be floral and a bit sweet, with some being almost flavorless. Gold rums get a fair amount of flavor from the barrels – which tend to be used bourbon barrels, like the rest of the spirits industry uses – including oak, char, vanilla, and some spiciness. The older, darker rums get mellow and smooth, with some rich, velvety vanilla and brown sugar notes.

    English-speaking regions use molasses, have a more lengthy fermentation, and are more likely to use pot stills (although a good number do use patent stills). The rums tend to be darker, and range in flavor from toasted coconut and caramelized pears (more of a Barbados style or Trinidadian style) to thick, molassesy, and sulfuric, sometimes with a gunpowdery flavor (Jamaica and Guyana). The clear rums will have that funk about them, with some sweetness, but less brown sugar.

    French-speaking regions tend to use pure cane juice, rather than molasses. They may use column or pot stills, and are frequently aged in oak. The whole cane juice gives these rums more of a grassy or fresh-wood flavor than is found in other styles, and they sometimes have a twang that is reminiscent of agave. Older rums have a bit more sweetness, along with toffee and caramel notes, as well as some darker leather and tobacco character.

    Estate rums are bottled by their distiller. Some independent bottlings are region-specific (the Plantation series has a number of regional rums), while others are blends (Denizen is Jamaica and Trinidad – and spectacular – while Banks 5 Island is Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados, Guyana, and Java). Still, the blends tend to list the origins of their rums on the bottle, since it's such important information for the consumer.

    Of course, there's a good deal of variation within this. Barbados rums and Jamaican rums taste totally different, even though they're both English-speaking regions. However, this should get you in the ballpark when approaching a new rum, and luckily, rum tends to be significantly less expensive than most other spirits (though some agricultural rums can get damn pricy).

    "So I've found some rums to try – what's the best way to drink them?"

    Like any premium spirit, fine aged rums can be enjoyed neat to great effect. While some of these fine spirits start at $40/fifth+, there are also some truly excellent sippers available for as little as $12, though sometimes you have to get lucky. These can be enjoyed as is, or with a bit of ice or water to your taste. One thing to remember with rums is that they age faster than almost any other spirit – tropical temperatures can do to a rum in 2 or 3 years what would take 6 years for bourbon or 10 years for Scotch. Of course, some rums (particularly 3rd-party bottlings) are aged in Europe or America, but generally even lightly aged rums are quite mellow.

    There are also a number of simple cocktails that show off a new rum to great effect. Aged rums respond well to the Old Fashioned treatment – rum, sugar (I like a rich turbinado syrup), and bitters are particularly good at showing off the nicer qualities of the more aggressive Jamaican, Guyanese, and Martinique rums. The Daiquiri is probably the most famous rum drink – lime, sugar, and ice do something amazing with literally every rum I've tried. A nice long drink is variously called a Caribeño or a rum coco or just rum and coconut water – somewhere along 3 parts coconut water (no added sugar) to 1 part rum, a dash of lime if you like, and ice. Of course if you've got cachaça you should treat yourself to a caipirinha and if you've got a nice Martinique, a Ti Punch is always welcome. You can also explore elaborate Tiki drinks, but that's another thread.

    So where to go from here? Normally I'd recommend searching out a good bar, but rum bars tend to be few and far between – in the States at least. If you're lucky enough to live in the San Francisco Bay Area I'd recommend checking out Smuggler's Cove, which probably has the finest rum collection of any bar in the States. If you know of an old Tiki bar in your area have a look – even if their cocktails are syrupy and awful (and sadly many venerable old Tiki palaces are are mere shades of their former selves) their rum selection should still be better than average, and you can begin tasting it yourself. If your bar scene seems bare, at least you can take comfort in the fact that it's easier on your wallet to explore rum than it is to explore Scotch or cognac or even rye. In the next post I'll give some guidance on bottles to start with.

    I hope you'll give it a shot. Rum has a bad rap as being cheap, sweet, and wretched, thanks in large part to horrible spiced rums and flavorless Bacardi swill. In truth I suspect there's no spirit as likely to surprise and delight as a fine rum, a liquid envoy from some faraway place, guaranteed to lift your tired spirit, and transport you to a world of flavor and ease. Cheers.


    Building your rum collection
    I think a good rum collection ought to show off the variety available in the world of rum. There's so much out there, it's hard to get by with only one or two. What follows is a good, all-purpose guide to growing your rum cabinet, for people interested in mixing as well as sipping. If you prefer certain flavor styles – spicy, fruity, funky – or know that you'll be sipping, rather than shaking up Hurricanes and Zombies, I can offer other guidance.

    1. Light Cuban-style rum. I like Flor de Caña Extra Dry (from Nicaragua), but Cruzan (US Virgin Islands) is also a decent choice. Havana Club is great if the US-Cuba embargo doesn't inconvenience you.
    Sweet, floral (jasmine), dry finish

    2. Dark Jamaican rum. I am a big, big proponent of Coruba. I think it's more sophisticated than Meyer's, and more Jamaican-tasting than Appleton Estate (which to me is too Bourbon-y). Plus it's cheap. Still, those are both decent choices if that's all you've got.
    Molasses or brown sugar, sulfur, maybe some oak, long twangy finish

    3. Gold Barbados rum. I love Plantation Barbados, but have enjoyed Mt. Gay Eclipse as well. If you wanna drop some coin on an XO Cognac-like rum, Mt. Gay Extra Old is one of the most well-known premiums.
    Some toffee, floral (roses and lilies), roasted stone fruit, coconut, medium sweet finish

    4. Barbancourt 5 Star. There's a reason this is one of the most well-regarded rums around. Smooth, cognac-like, and refined. Makes an amazing Old Fashioned.
    Tiny bit of brown sugar, tobacco, leather, wet earth, and wood shavings. Long dry finish

    5. Demerara rum. El Dorado 5-year is a great choice that's become pretty available Stateside lately. I haven't had the Lemon Hart 80, which I suspect is somewhat different. Tasting notes are for the El Dorado. It's a bit sweet on its own, but makes a memorable Daiquiri.
    Toffee. Caramel. Burnt sugar. Brittle. Brown butter. Dark confections. Really sweet, but not (quite) syrupy

    6. Smith and Cross. This is a rum that has to be tasted to be believed. It's as close as you get to the sort of stuff they were tossing back 200 years ago. Dark, rich, with an insanely long finish and a thick mouthfeel. It makes a better punch than any other spirit I've tried. It's a bit rough on its own (bottled at 115 proof), but in an Old Fashioned it's pretty much unparalleled.
    Brown sugar, sulfer, huge twang, thick texture, long sticky mouthfeel

    Those 6 will get you started damn well. At its peak my rum collection also included the Flor de Caña 4-year gold (spicy, caramel, vanilla, long oaky finish), J. Wray and Nephew Overproof Jamaican (buttery nose, heavy twang, sweet finish), Batavia Arrack van Oosten (mossy, wet stone, jungle undergrowth), and Lemon Hart Demerara 151 (thick brown sugar, gunpowder, sulfur, hot hot finish) – the best 151 there is. I've been hankering after a nice aged Martinique rum for a while, but those are a bit pricey, so that Rhum JM VSOP will have to wait a bit more.

    There are also some more sipping-oriented rums out there to try. In addition to Mt. Gay Extra Old, which I've already mentioned, there's Ron Zacapa 23 (the winningest rum at international tastings), Zaya 12 (and 1, and Angostura 1919. These are all velvety and lovely, and will impress pretty much anyone who tries.

  5. #50

    Resident Panty Buncher phinz's Avatar


     

    Re: RUM

    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Raccoon View Post

    has anyone tried any of the Dogfish Head rums?
    Don't know about the DFH rums, but the Rogue rums are horrid.

    If you can find it, a surprisingly good rum for a low price is Siesta Key's silver. If you like a nice spiced rum, try One Barrel out of Belize. It's cheap and delicious.

    Any of the Eldorado rums older than 3 years are great. In fact, any of the Demerara rums out of Guyana are typically pretty fine drams. If you can get it, Lemon Hart 80 is incredible. It's not available in the States, but those who visit Canada can get it easily.

    The best overproof rum in the world, for me, is LemonHart 151. It's a Demerara rum and is the key ingredient in many traditional tiki drinks. Tiki drinks that require it don't taste the same without it.

    I've a metric crap ton of rums in my bar. Some really good, others not so much. Last count had something like 120 rums in my bar, if you include the cruddy flavored ones people have brought over and left.

  6. #51

    Evolving Lead Puffer Fish edwardsdigital's Avatar


     

    Re: RUM

    Quote Originally Posted by phinz View Post
    if you include the cruddy flavored ones people have brought over and left.
    I may end up with a few of those cruddy flavored ones here soon..... I am going to try my hand at infusion. I am planning to start with a few simple one flavor infusions this weekend (habanero, cinnamon, and mint first) then move on to a full on spiced rum recipe. I just picked up 2 750ml bottles of Bacardi gold for the base, and will probably start with half bottle batches at first. I really want to get the perfect mint rum down for a good mojito for a get together later next week (mint takes 3-5 days to steep).

    I hope I dont end up with undrinkable embalming fluid when I am done, but I am sure I will screw up at least one of the first batches!

  7. #52

    Full grown Puffer Fish JGIORD's Avatar


     

    Re: RUM

    I find the spiced rums to be a bit too overly and artificially sweet. Everyone's tastes are different but I like:

    1. Pyratt
    2. Bacardi Reserve 8
    3. Zaya
    4. Zacapa

    I've tried the Gosling's Black Seal as well. Very interesting stuff, but not something I would drink on a regular basis. Definitely something everyone should try though.
    "you forgot one very important thing, mate: I'm Captain Jack Sparrow"...Savvy?

  8. #53

    Evolving Lead Puffer Fish FireRunner's Avatar


     

    Re: RUM

    Quote Originally Posted by JGIORD View Post
    I find the spiced rums to be a bit too overly and artificially sweet. Everyone's tastes are different but I like:

    1. Pyratt
    2. Bacardi Reserve 8
    3. Zaya
    4. Zacapa

    I've tried the Gosling's Black Seal as well. Very interesting stuff, but not something I would drink on a regular basis. Definitely something everyone should try though.
    100% agree with your response about most rums tasting too sweet. I cannot stand rum that tastes like I'm drinking pure sugar water. Pyratt is the only rum I drink (straight). I haven't found another rum close to it.
    20 years of smoking and still going strong *cough* *cough*...

  9. #54

    Evolving Lead Puffer Fish edwardsdigital's Avatar


     

    Re: RUM

    After a few hours getting lost on the interwebz reading about infusion, I am going to start with the 3 pretty peppers I have before me (1 scorpion, 1 scotch bonnet, and 1 pumpkin hab - thanks to one of the guys at work!) I should get heat in the rum in a few hours, with hell in a bottle by monday night.... oh and I will pick up some mint tomorrow to get that started (kinda psyched on the scorpion infused rum personally - Golden Scorpion sounds like a good name)

  10. #55

    Leading Puffer Fish cubanrob19's Avatar


     

    Re: RUM

    Rum is my go to drink with a smoke ... Ive never gone all out and spent $80+ on a bottle ... yet ... but I like the selections I cycle through which are:

    Bacardi 8,
    Flor De Cana 12
    &
    Ron Zacapa 23

  11. #56

    Full grown Puffer Fish JGIORD's Avatar


     

    Re: RUM

    Quote Originally Posted by FireRunner View Post
    100% agree with your response about most rums tasting too sweet. I cannot stand rum that tastes like I'm drinking pure sugar water. Pyratt is the only rum I drink (straight). I haven't found another rum close to it.
    Firerunner, give the Bacardi 8 a try. It is less sweet with a bit more of an alcohol kick. Has some great aromas with some citrus notes. Pyrat is sweeter than the Bacardi, but it is also smoother.
    "you forgot one very important thing, mate: I'm Captain Jack Sparrow"...Savvy?

  12. #57

    Evolving Lead Puffer Fish FireRunner's Avatar


     

    Re: RUM

    Quote Originally Posted by JGIORD View Post
    Firerunner, give the Bacardi 8 a try. It is less sweet with a bit more of an alcohol kick. Has some great aromas with some citrus notes. Pyrat is sweeter than the Bacardi, but it is also smoother.
    Will give it a try. I frequent a local bar and normally I only drink Pyrat. Off and on they'll run out and I'll try a few other rums but they are always too sweet for me. I end up adding so much ice just to ease the sweetness.
    20 years of smoking and still going strong *cough* *cough*...

  13. #58

    Maturing Puffer Fish Favvers's Avatar


     

    Re: RUM

    I'm a big fan of Varadero 8. A bit of age really makes the difference. As far as spiced rums go, The Kraken is pretty good. A good mixer is Goslings Black Seal. Good with Coke, great with ginger beer and lime for a classic Bermudian dark and stormy.

  14. #59

    Leading Puffer Fish cubanrob19's Avatar


     

    Re: RUM

    has anyone ever tried Vizcaya VXOP 21 yr rum? Its a Cuban formula rum made in the Dominican Republic.

    I went to Specs today cause this thread got me in the mood to get a new bottle of rum, and the lady there recommended it, so I figured why not. Its an old style rum, made with hand harvested sugar canes instead of molasses.
    I had a small glass straight today, and it was very good. Strong aroma and full bodied ... it was a bit harsh on the first sip, but after i let it breath a little it smoothed out nicely.

    Name:  Vizcaya Rum - Padron 45 - Cigar Snob.jpg
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  15. #60

    Maturing Puffer Fish Favvers's Avatar


     

    Re: RUM

    Quote Originally Posted by cubanrob19 View Post
    has anyone ever tried Vizcaya VXOP 21 yr rum? Its a Cuban formula rum made in the Dominican Republic.

    I went to Specs today cause this thread got me in the mood to get a new bottle of rum, and the lady there recommended it, so I figured why not. Its an old style rum, made with hand harvested sugar canes instead of molasses.
    I had a small glass straight today, and it was very good. Strong aroma and full bodied ... it was a bit harsh on the first sip, but after i let it breath a little it smoothed out nicely.

    Name:  Vizcaya Rum - Padron 45 - Cigar Snob.jpg
Views: 87
Size:  151.7 KB
    That sounds really good. I like rums to have a bit of fire at first before you get the burnt, sweet tastes at the end.

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