Puff Cigar Discussion Forums
MEMBER CIGAR REVIEWS | STAFF CIGAR REVIEWS | CIGAR VIDEOS | ONE ON ONE INTERVIEWS | CIGAR NEWS | CIGAR FORUMS | PIPES | LIFESTYLE | CONTACT

User Tag List

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 61

What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

This is a discussion on What's the most expensive pipe that you own? within the General Pipe Forum forums, part of the Pipe Smokers Forums category; Originally Posted by MarkC That said, as far as smoking performance excluding the obvious bottom of the bowl problem, I'd ...

  
  1. #46

    Maturing Puffer Fish rogermugs's Avatar


     

    Re: What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkC View Post

    That said, as far as smoking performance excluding the obvious bottom of the bowl problem, I'd say they surpass my Stanwells.
    Certainly makes me wonder if MM offered a $150 pipe if everyone would be able to get over our mental perception of them being cheap and rank it amongst the best. Some already do, but I admit to the mental hang up of liking my $5 better than than $50+ dollar pipes all the time. I find myself reaching for briar just because I know what they cost, but every time I'm on my favorite tobaccos i don't want to "waste" them on anything less than my MM's. but I'm uncertain any of my briars are worth writing home about.

    Hence the question. This has become a fascinating thread, sorry if I hijacked.

  2. #47

    Elder Puffer Fish Leader MarkC's Avatar


     

    Re: What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

    Well...if they were to offer a $150 pipe, it would have to at least eliminate the "obvious bottom of the bowl problem" for one thing. Let's face it, their being cheap is not just a mental perception. Not only is the material cheaper, shoving a stick in a hole of a cob isn't exactly on the same level as carving the whole body of the pipe out of briar. And saying I'd put it ahead of my Stanwells for smoking performance doesn't exactly put it 'amongst the best'. But I get your point; how often do we get a new poster here who wants advice on a pipe to start with but won't even consider a cob because of their preconceptions. It's a shame, but I figure it's their loss, and there's not much we can do about it. One thing's for sure; if you're talking 'bang for the buck', nothing can beat a cob.

    By the way, this doesn't seem like a threadjack to me; seems like a logical course of the conversation. But I've been accused of going off topic before...
    ********.com

  3. #48

    Puffer Fish with some spikes iggy_jet's Avatar


     

    Re: What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

    My first pipe was a Cob.
    It was always on a shelf in my garage and anytime I tinkered with the car or motorcycle i would lite it up and take a break.
    Not sure why i went and got a briar pipe... Hmmmmm
    Sometimes simplicity is best
    Might just go and get one and leave it in the garage again... it was nice not to care if you dropped it, got grease on it .... it was always there and smoked very well...

  4. #49

    Sot-weed Bohemian freestoke's Avatar


     

    Re: What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkC View Post
    Well...if they were to offer a $150 pipe, it would have to at least eliminate the "obvious bottom of the bowl problem" for one thing.
    Or you could smoke it until the space under the "tray" fills in with ash and gunk, at which point the draught hole is point on. I try not to burn off or damage that tray as I smoke a cob in the early going -- actually, ever. I never scrap out the bottom the way I do a briar every so often. Eventually the bottom looks pretty much like a briar.
    Vegetarian -- that's an old Indian word meaning "lousy hunter". -- Andy Rooney

  5. #50

    Snuff-hound steinr1's Avatar


     

    Re: What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

    I'm no expert on the smoking qualities of a cob. I've owned two in thirty years of pipes, on and off. One a mini (which recently burnt through when I attempted to reacquaint myself with what a cob was like) and one more "standard" straight one - which is missing in action.

    What I remember of them is that they do smoke perfectly well, but no "better" to my memory than a decent briar - at least in terms of the physical conversion of tobacco into smoke, water and ash. But I also remember a couple of "issues". The wooden stem burns internally for a while (I can't see that as a good thing...) and I do also remember that there was a distinct taste to it. Unsurprisingly, of corn. I think I've seen people refer to this and say that it does fade, but that's not my memory. Maybe I never smoked it enough (though I doubt it...). I feel that this quality was always there, albeit definitely much stronger (to the point of me finding it unpleasant) at first.

    There is a difference discernible between my Cherrywood and briar pipes - I think - in terms of taste. But I always think of this as the Cherrywood having a taste and the briar being neutral. I also use "the pipe" quite a bit for tasting of tobaccos I'm not familiar with. They are definitely neutral and I can't detect any difference in the taste from a briar apart from there being more intensity in the plastic/carbon pipes (but they have many downsides too).

    I feel that this lack of "pipe taste" is one part of the mix that makes up a "good" pipe. If cobs do indeed impart a long-term taste of their own, I would view it as a fault. I'm happy to admit that Cherrywood is flawed in this respect. The other flaws of briar - ghosting and needing to rest - are mitigated by having enough pipes in a rotation and sticking to one blend per pipe. Admittedly not an easy ask.

    In terms of value for money, cobs seem to be a no-brainer. But...

    Are cobs flawed in terms of affecting the smoke's taste? Should I have smoked harder and everything would have been fine? Or do you see any added taste as a virtue?

    (No apologies for drifting this thread even further off line... I love it.)
    "Never keep up with the Joneses. Drag them down to your level." - Quentin Crisp

  6. #51

    Maturing Puffer Fish rogermugs's Avatar


     

    Re: What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

    Quote Originally Posted by steinr1 View Post

    Are cobs flawed in terms of affecting the smoke's taste? Should I have smoked harder and everything would have been fine? Or do you see any added taste as a virtue?
    If anything I was under the impression the cob offered one of the most clean-tasting smoking experiences.... at least that's been my experience and what I've read. I have heard about eventual stem-wood flavor leaking through, but people talk about that taking a while to rear its head, and then waning quickly thereafter. Never experienced it myself.

  7. #52

    Elder Puffer Fish Leader MarkC's Avatar


     

    Re: What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

    Quote Originally Posted by freestoke View Post
    Or you could smoke it until the space under the "tray" fills in with ash and gunk, at which point the draught hole is point on. I try not to burn off or damage that tray as I smoke a cob in the early going -- actually, ever. I never scrap out the bottom the way I do a briar every so often. Eventually the bottom looks pretty much like a briar.
    Exactly what I do. But if I've got to fix the pipe, I'm not paying the maker for the job!
    ********.com

  8. #53

    Elder Puffer Fish Leader MarkC's Avatar


     

    Re: What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

    Quote Originally Posted by steinr1 View Post
    What I remember of them is that they do smoke perfectly well, but no "better" to my memory than a decent briar - at least in terms of the physical conversion of tobacco into smoke, water and ash. But I also remember a couple of "issues". The wooden stem burns internally for a while (I can't see that as a good thing...) and I do also remember that there was a distinct taste to it. Unsurprisingly, of corn. I think I've seen people refer to this and say that it does fade, but that's not my memory. Maybe I never smoked it enough (though I doubt it...). I feel that this quality was always there, albeit definitely much stronger (to the point of me finding it unpleasant) at first.

    There is a difference discernible between my Cherrywood and briar pipes - I think - in terms of taste. But I always think of this as the Cherrywood having a taste and the briar being neutral. I also use "the pipe" quite a bit for tasting of tobaccos I'm not familiar with. They are definitely neutral and I can't detect any difference in the taste from a briar apart from there being more intensity in the plastic/carbon pipes (but they have many downsides too).

    I feel that this lack of "pipe taste" is one part of the mix that makes up a "good" pipe. If cobs do indeed impart a long-term taste of their own, I would view it as a fault. I'm happy to admit that Cherrywood is flawed in this respect. The other flaws of briar - ghosting and needing to rest - are mitigated by having enough pipes in a rotation and sticking to one blend per pipe. Admittedly not an easy ask.

    In terms of value for money, cobs seem to be a no-brainer. But...

    Are cobs flawed in terms of affecting the smoke's taste? Should I have smoked harder and everything would have been fine? Or do you see any added taste as a virtue?

    (No apologies for drifting this thread even further off line... I love it.)
    Well...first of all, I disagree that a briar pipe is neutral. The added flavors I taste in my virginias when smoking in a briar vs smoking in a meer must be coming from somewhere. As for the cob flavor, as far as it being strong enough to recognize as cob, I'm afraid I'm one of the ones that notices it early and then sees it fade away. At that point, the effect to me is no more distracting than a briar. As I tend to smoke different tobaccos in each (last nights HOTW in a cob was a rarity), I probably wouldn't notice the variance.
    ********.com

  9. #54

    Sot-weed Bohemian freestoke's Avatar


     

    Re: What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkC View Post
    As for the cob flavor, as far as it being strong enough to recognize as cob, I'm afraid I'm one of the ones that notices it early and then sees it fade away.
    I taste the pine stem, not the corncob when I'm breaking one in. Turpentine. Once it boils off and gets coated with proper tobacco gunk and the "tray" chars over, I don't taste it any more. Takes me about a dozen bowls for the initial break-in period, maybe ten times that to fill in the bottom. (Disclaimer: I have one of the most undiscriminating palates on the forum. )
    Vegetarian -- that's an old Indian word meaning "lousy hunter". -- Andy Rooney

  10. #55

    Evolving Lead Puffer Fish


     

    Re: What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

    Most expensive I own would be the Tinsky 3 star, but as far as the cost I have no idea as it was a gift. Most expensive I bought was a Tinsky 1 star freehand...think I paid $350.

  11. #56

    Puffer Fish with some spikes iggy_jet's Avatar


     

    Re: What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

    I was in store today and there on the wall was s very simple MM with a straight stem.. and It was only $5.
    Well, I couldn't resist, It came home with me. Not that I needed one, but now I got one.


  12. #57

    Full grown Puffer Fish


     

    Re: What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

    I was reading Rick Newcombe's second book last night, Still Searching for Pipe Dreams. He's the "high grade collector" who promoted Bo Nordh heavily in pipe magazine articles for years, along with S Bang and some other pipe makers, perhaps contributing to these $10,000+ prices. In the second book, he does pause for a few minutes to wonder if it makes sense, although he still obviously believes that his multi thousand dollar pipes actually smoke better than a "mere" $500+ pipe. He does recommend that for the unfortunate people who can't afford a Bo Nordh, they MIGHT be able to get a comparable pipe for considerably less by choosing a less well known maker. Haha. I enjoyed his book, but I think he's a bit kooky on the issue.

    My most expensive pipes so far have been an Altinok meer, for a couple of hundred dollars, and two patent era Dunhills for about $75 each, which I'm FINALLY about to send for full restoration and new stems. Unrestored, but cleaned, they aren't my favorite pipes. That prize goes to a John Bessai pipe, made sometime in the 1960s in Ohio, Cleveland, and a Malaga from the same era. Both cost well under $40. I guess those guys in the 60's didn't spend a whole week making a single pipe, they had customers lining up that they needed to serve, and the customers just wanted good smoking pipes. I guess they also didn't look for the "the perfect piece of briar" for each of their "artistic creations". Even so, I still believe that the old estates from that era are some of the best deals you can get. I now have about 14 Malaga pipes, of which about 10 are just fantastic, the other four are a bit sub-par and/or the wrong shape and size for me.

    Haha. I work for a publishing company, my boss was shouting the other day about wanting a few more craftsmen around the company and a lot less artists. I sympathize with that statement.
    Last edited by Irfan; 02-27-2013 at 09:35 PM.
    If I could write poetry, I'd be a poet. I can't, so I smoke a pipe instead ....

  13. #58

    Full grown Puffer Fish


     

    Re: What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

    Hahaha. I'll sit out this round.

    RARE Old Vintage Antique African Smoking Pipe | eBay
    If I could write poetry, I'd be a poet. I can't, so I smoke a pipe instead ....

  14. #59

    Full grown Puffer Fish


     

    Re: What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

    i have a couple 1 is a design berlin globe pipe now mind you i didn't pay what its worth but it's an 850.00 pipe and a savinelli diamond line which i was told is a higher grade than an autograph 00, so i'm assuming it's passed the 1000.00 price. i got both of them unsmoked for less than 250.00. but the most i've paid for a pipe is a vauen horst lichter 12 for 245.00

  15. #60

    Young Puffer Fish


     

    Re: What's the most expensive pipe that you own?

    My Savinelli Churchwarden was $70.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •