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How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

This is a discussion on How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE within the The Pipe Hobby How-To Discussion Forum forums, part of the Pipe Smokers Forums category; Originally Posted by ProbateGeek Wow - whatever you paid that sure was worth it. Truly a nice looking pipe, though ...

  
  1. #151

    Awaiting Confirmation karatekyle's Avatar


     

    Re: How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

    Quote Originally Posted by ProbateGeek View Post
    Wow - whatever you paid that sure was worth it.

    Truly a nice looking pipe, though I thought from the 'before' shots that rim had been burned clear through.
    Looks like he ground it down and re-built it.

  2. #152

    Elder Puffer Fish Leader DanR's Avatar


     

    Re: How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

    For the rim, I just used some 180 grit sand paper, laid it on the table and sanded away. I bet I went down nearly 1/8 inch (I compared it to another new Peterson tankard that I own, and this one is definitely shorter now). Then I used some 600 grit paper to round out the bowl from the inside.

    I also removed the silver thingy and sanded all around the outside of the pipe with various grits (there's a rundown earlier in the thread, I followed that recommendation). Once it was baby's butt smooth, I added the two coats of the minwax, waiting overnight between coats and hitting it lightly with 0000 steel wool in between.

    I glued the silver piece back on using some epoxy that a local woodworking store told me would stand the heat and not produce fumes.

    Then two coats of carnuba and several coats of the aforementioned "pipe wax".

    I couldn't be more proud of myself, as this pipe turned out much better than I expected...

    Oh, and I paid something like $26 for the pipe on the bay, no lie!

  3. #153

    A Squid founder, retired ProbateGeek's Avatar


     

    Re: How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

    Quote Originally Posted by DanR View Post
    Oh, and I paid something like $26 for the pipe on the bay, no lie!
    Does it have a sister?

  4. #154

    Full grown Puffer Fish JuanOrez's Avatar


     

    Re: How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

    Quote Originally Posted by ProbateGeek View Post
    Does it have a sister?
    LOL
    WOOOOO!

  5. #155

    Leading Puffer Fish


     

    Re: How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

    Quote Originally Posted by DanR View Post
    For the rim, I just used some 180 grit sand paper, laid it on the table and sanded away. I bet I went down nearly 1/8 inch (I compared it to another new Peterson tankard that I own, and this one is definitely shorter now). Then I used some 600 grit paper to round out the bowl from the inside.

    I also removed the silver thingy and sanded all around the outside of the pipe with various grits (there's a rundown earlier in the thread, I followed that recommendation). Once it was baby's butt smooth, I added the two coats of the minwax, waiting overnight between coats and hitting it lightly with 0000 steel wool in between.

    I glued the silver piece back on using some epoxy that a local woodworking store told me would stand the heat and not produce fumes.

    Then two coats of carnuba and several coats of the aforementioned "pipe wax".

    I couldn't be more proud of myself, as this pipe turned out much better than I expected...

    Oh, and I paid something like $26 for the pipe on the bay, no lie!
    It turned out spectacular, I am seriously jealous... I want to do this myself, but I have to find the right candidate for it... I think the silver band really makes it.
    Join us for the Puff Monthly Tobacco Review: May's blend is Dunhill's Nightcap. Post reviews and join the discussion here.

  6. #156

    Newbie in the ocean smokingstockholmer's Avatar


     

    Re: How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

    I have some questions before set out to clean the pipes from my grandpa´s collection (pipes in "My grandfather´s..." thread).

    Btw, I showed my father the link to the pipes and he said he really wanted to help me with the cleaning. He went from pipes to cigarettes maybe 20 years ago and he said he wants to pick up pipe smoking again. I gave him the link to puff.com and to some good online tobacconists (tobacco is expensive in Sweden...). He already have quite a good pipe collection, including some Dunhills my grandfather gave him.

    Anyway, regarding the pipes. They look like being in quite good condition, dirty yes but they sure look ok. I'm no aspiring pipe restorer, I just want to get the pipes clean. What do you think about this?

    Ream the bowls using a too small reamer dividing the bowl into four quadrants reaming one quadrant a time. I feel this method gives me good control.
    This method is described on pipethought´s youtube channel.

    After that salt and alcohol treatment.

    At it with bristle pipe cleaners and regular ones.

    Polish the bowl with Denicare bowl polish.

    Brush the mouth piece with toothpaste.

    Work the mouth piece with pipe cleaners.

    Polish the mouth piece with Denicare stem polish.

    I want to make things as simple as possible although I want good results. What do you guys think about the method described above. Would love some input.

  7. #157

    Awaiting Confirmation karatekyle's Avatar


     

    Re: How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

    Quote Originally Posted by smokingstockholmer View Post
    I have some questions before set out to clean the pipes from my grandpa´s collection (pipes in "My grandfather´s..." thread).

    Btw, I showed my father the link to the pipes and he said he really wanted to help me with the cleaning. He went from pipes to cigarettes maybe 20 years ago and he said he wants to pick up pipe smoking again. I gave him the link to puff.com and to some good online tobacconists (tobacco is expensive in Sweden...). He already have quite a good pipe collection, including some Dunhills my grandfather gave him.

    Anyway, regarding the pipes. They look like being in quite good condition, dirty yes but they sure look ok. I'm no aspiring pipe restorer, I just want to get the pipes clean. What do you think about this?

    Ream the bowls using a too small reamer dividing the bowl into four quadrants reaming one quadrant a time. I feel this method gives me good control.
    This method is described on pipethought´s youtube channel.

    After that salt and alcohol treatment.

    At it with bristle pipe cleaners and regular ones.

    Polish the bowl with Denicare bowl polish.

    Brush the mouth piece with toothpaste.

    Work the mouth piece with pipe cleaners.

    Polish the mouth piece with Denicare stem polish.

    I want to make things as simple as possible although I want good results. What do you guys think about the method described above. Would love some input.
    That looks like a solid plan, Johan. When you say "brush the mouthpiece" with toothpaste, I would edit it to "rub" mouthpiece. Don't the mouthpiece like you brush your teeth, use the paste like a sanding salve.

  8. #158

    Leading Puffer Fish


     

    Re: How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

    Quote Originally Posted by smokingstockholmer View Post
    I have some questions before set out to clean the pipes from my grandpa´s collection (pipes in "My grandfather´s..." thread).

    Btw, I showed my father the link to the pipes and he said he really wanted to help me with the cleaning. He went from pipes to cigarettes maybe 20 years ago and he said he wants to pick up pipe smoking again. I gave him the link to puff.com and to some good online tobacconists (tobacco is expensive in Sweden...). He already have quite a good pipe collection, including some Dunhills my grandfather gave him.

    Anyway, regarding the pipes. They look like being in quite good condition, dirty yes but they sure look ok. I'm no aspiring pipe restorer, I just want to get the pipes clean. What do you think about this?

    Ream the bowls using a too small reamer dividing the bowl into four quadrants reaming one quadrant a time. I feel this method gives me good control.
    This method is described on pipethought´s youtube channel.

    After that salt and alcohol treatment.

    At it with bristle pipe cleaners and regular ones.

    Polish the bowl with Denicare bowl polish.

    Brush the mouth piece with toothpaste.

    Work the mouth piece with pipe cleaners.

    Polish the mouth piece with Denicare stem polish.

    I want to make things as simple as possible although I want good results. What do you guys think about the method described above. Would love some input.
    Sounds good if you aren't going out for the all out restoration. I would add using a castleford reamer, it has 4 different size blades and the smallest one should fit in your smaller pipes. If you want to ream more and the next size up is too big, then you can go for the pipe knife and scrape it out (that's what I do anyway). Also pick up a shank brush, it will pay for itself in the pipe cleaners it saves.
    Join us for the Puff Monthly Tobacco Review: May's blend is Dunhill's Nightcap. Post reviews and join the discussion here.

  9. #159

    Awaiting Confirmation karatekyle's Avatar


     

    Re: How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick S. View Post
    Sounds good if you aren't going out for the all out restoration. I would add using a castleford reamer, it has 4 different size blades and the smallest one should fit in your smaller pipes. If you want to ream more and the next size up is too big, then you can go for the pipe knife and scrape it out (that's what I do anyway). Also pick up a shank brush, it will pay for itself in the pipe cleaners it saves.
    Agreed. I knife-ream all my pipes. Not a big reamer guy, myself.

  10. #160

    Codger In Training gahdzila's Avatar


     

    Re: How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

    Great thread, Kyle!

    Not sure if this question fits here or not, but here goes:

    I have a pipe with some issues. The brand name, I was told, is "Greek Smooth"....though it has "ITALY" stamped on the shank LOL. I bought it new just a couple of months ago. It was a cheapie ($18, marked down from $30-something), but I like the shape and it smokes pretty good, and I just can't bring myself to throw something out that still has some kind of useable life in it, so I think it will be worth it to get this issue worked out.

    The finish is very smooth, glossy, and hard. Like a piano, or really glossy hardwood floors, except not as thick of a finish. I know nothing about this stuff, but I'm guessing it's a polyurethane, but I'm just guessing. The finish is starting to "bubble" and "blister", if that makes sense. A spot about 3/8 inch in diameter blistered up on the bottom just last night.

    I'm still a fairly new piper, I smoke cobs almost exclusively and only have a couple of briars that I smoke occasionally, so I can certainly fathom the possibility that I'm doing something wrong, smoking too hot or something. The smoke is not uncomfortably hot in the mouth, and the pipe itself gets very warm but still comfortable to hold in the hand.

    Poor technique on my part? Smoking too hot? Or crappy cheap finish on a cheapie machine made pipe? Combination of the two?

    I assume a full acetone treatment and refinish is in order. But I'd hate to put in the work to have this happen again just a few smokes down the road.

    Thanks in advance for any thoughts!

  11. #161

    Awaiting Confirmation karatekyle's Avatar


     

    Re: How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

    Quote Originally Posted by gahdzila View Post
    Great thread, Kyle!

    Not sure if this question fits here or not, but here goes:

    I have a pipe with some issues. The brand name, I was told, is "Greek Smooth"....though it has "ITALY" stamped on the shank LOL. I bought it new just a couple of months ago. It was a cheapie ($18, marked down from $30-something), but I like the shape and it smokes pretty good, and I just can't bring myself to throw something out that still has some kind of useable life in it, so I think it will be worth it to get this issue worked out.

    The finish is very smooth, glossy, and hard. Like a piano, or really glossy hardwood floors, except not as thick of a finish. I know nothing about this stuff, but I'm guessing it's a polyurethane, but I'm just guessing. The finish is starting to "bubble" and "blister", if that makes sense. A spot about 3/8 inch in diameter blistered up on the bottom just last night.

    I'm still a fairly new piper, I smoke cobs almost exclusively and only have a couple of briars that I smoke occasionally, so I can certainly fathom the possibility that I'm doing something wrong, smoking too hot or something. The smoke is not uncomfortably hot in the mouth, and the pipe itself gets very warm but still comfortable to hold in the hand.

    Poor technique on my part? Smoking too hot? Or crappy cheap finish on a cheapie machine made pipe? Combination of the two?

    I assume a full acetone treatment and refinish is in order. But I'd hate to put in the work to have this happen again just a few smokes down the road.

    Thanks in advance for any thoughts!
    User error can always play a part in pipe problems but it sounds like the original finish here might be to blame. I think almost any briar pipe in this predicament can be refinished correctly and smoked enjoyably. Polyurethane is NOT for finishing pipes. Stains can be interchanged but a good finishing product is not something you can cut corners on. A some point, polyurethane will bubble.

    Unfortunately, acetone takes around two to three billion coats to strip polyurethane. You're going to need to either strip it with a paintstripping gel/goo or sand it. I recommend the gel/goo because its really hard to effectively sand a pipe without leaving scratches in the briar.

    After that, the pipe needs to be finished the way it should've been finished in the first place. It needs a couple coats of carnauba wax or some other finishing wax/oil that works with briar and heat (mineral oil, raw tung oil, paragon wax, halcyon wax, etc).

    The pipe might still smoke hot after the refinish but it won't bubble and look bad, at least!

  12. #162

    gonna be a daddy! gibson_es's Avatar


     

    Re: How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

    After reading oart ofth thread i decided to go with the toothpaste idea, with a toothbrush, for the stem.

    I did follow it with olive oil because its all i got. I didnt bother with sanding or anything. Im keeping this pipe for myself. I will sand the next one though.. one steo at a time right?


    Here is before:





    Here is after:







    There ia still some rough spots, but i dont mind them for myself.






    QUESTION:

    any tips on pioe reaming? i am not doijg so well, after hours of work on reaming, i said screw it and got a sanding bit for my drill, like i said its for me. And ts my first restoration. So i figure some scoring wont bother me.. but i dont wanna do it again.

  13. #163

    Awaiting Confirmation karatekyle's Avatar


     

    Re: How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

    Quote Originally Posted by gibson_es View Post
    QUESTION:

    any tips on pioe reaming? i am not doijg so well, after hours of work on reaming, i said screw it and got a sanding bit for my drill, like i said its for me. And ts my first restoration. So i figure some scoring wont bother me.. but i dont wanna do it again.
    I'd say, just take it show and steady. Its all about control. And err on the side of taking too little off. Its better to have slightly too much cake than too little.

  14. #164

    Codger In Training gahdzila's Avatar


     

    Re: How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

    Thanks again, Kyle! I found Formby's Furniture Workshop Paint and Poly Remover at Lowe's and figured it would be worth a shot. It worked FANTASTIC at stripping the finish off of my little tomato. The directions say to paint it on and leave it for a while then scrape it with a scraper. The finish on my pipe didn't seem thick enough to warrant that. So I just dabbed a little of the stuff on a rag and rubbed. Worked great! Some of the stain came off as well, so it's a little lighter now....but it was a fairly dark stained pipe, and I'm totally fine with the color now. So....now I'm down to bare wood. I wouldnt say it's as smooth as glass, but it's pretty darned smooth underneath, so I don't think I need to sand. Just need to finish now.

    Of note - I accidentally got a couple of smears of the Formby's in the bowl, and this stuff eats cake like my 4 year old daughter at her birthday party yesterday. Just FYI for anyone that decides to try this stuff in the future.

    About finishing - the options I see mentioned are mineral oil, tung oil, and carnauba wax. Could you please run through the pros and cons of each? Maybe it's already been posted but if it was, I missed it. I'd be interested in hearing comparisons of what kind of finish I can expect from each, and how much work is involved in each. Mineral oil and tung oil are both available locally, but I haven't seen carnauba (I could order it from the pipe shop you mentioned, though). I don't yet have a buffer, but I have a couple of drills and I saw some buffing wheels and stuff for drills at Lowe's, so machine buffing is an option if necessary. I also saw linseed oil? Isn't this used on gun stocks? Is this another option or no?

    Thanks again for all of the info, Kyle! I snapped a couple of pics of the little tomato, and I'll post before and after pics when I'm done! Next project is the nasty Falcon I snagged on eBay!

  15. #165

    Awaiting Confirmation karatekyle's Avatar


     

    Re: How To Restore Estate Pipes YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED HERE

    Quote Originally Posted by gahdzila View Post
    Thanks again, Kyle! I found Formby's Furniture Workshop Paint and Poly Remover at Lowe's and figured it would be worth a shot. It worked FANTASTIC at stripping the finish off of my little tomato. The directions say to paint it on and leave it for a while then scrape it with a scraper. The finish on my pipe didn't seem thick enough to warrant that. So I just dabbed a little of the stuff on a rag and rubbed. Worked great! Some of the stain came off as well, so it's a little lighter now....but it was a fairly dark stained pipe, and I'm totally fine with the color now. So....now I'm down to bare wood. I wouldnt say it's as smooth as glass, but it's pretty darned smooth underneath, so I don't think I need to sand. Just need to finish now.

    Of note - I accidentally got a couple of smears of the Formby's in the bowl, and this stuff eats cake like my 4 year old daughter at her birthday party yesterday. Just FYI for anyone that decides to try this stuff in the future.

    About finishing - the options I see mentioned are mineral oil, tung oil, and carnauba wax. Could you please run through the pros and cons of each? Maybe it's already been posted but if it was, I missed it. I'd be interested in hearing comparisons of what kind of finish I can expect from each, and how much work is involved in each. Mineral oil and tung oil are both available locally, but I haven't seen carnauba (I could order it from the pipe shop you mentioned, though). I don't yet have a buffer, but I have a couple of drills and I saw some buffing wheels and stuff for drills at Lowe's, so machine buffing is an option if necessary. I also saw linseed oil? Isn't this used on gun stocks? Is this another option or no?

    Thanks again for all of the info, Kyle! I snapped a couple of pics of the little tomato, and I'll post before and after pics when I'm done! Next project is the nasty Falcon I snagged on eBay!
    I don't know anything about the heat resistance of linseed oil. But I've found that natural oils rarely end up not working. As far as the pros and cons of each finish, it really comes down to the look. If you like the glassy finish, its a pro of carnauba and the lack thereof is a con of tung and mineral oils. Mineral oil gives wood a "dipped in water and dried off" look. Tung oil is the in between. Depending on how many times you repeat the coat, dry, and sand process; the shinier it'll be. And then carnauba is the most well known, a polyurethane type "glassy" finish.

    Hope that helps!

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