Puff Cigar Discussion Forums
MEMBER CIGAR REVIEWS | STAFF CIGAR REVIEWS | CIGAR VIDEOS | ONE ON ONE INTERVIEWS | CIGAR NEWS | CIGAR FORUMS | PIPES | LIFESTYLE | CONTACT

User Tag List

Results 1 to 15 of 15

Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

This is a discussion on Breaking in a new ... estate pipe? within the The Pipe Hobby How-To Discussion Forum forums, part of the Pipe Smokers Forums category; As a cob and meer smoker, I don't know much about briars, so forgive the newbie type question. I've got ...

  
  1. #1

    Full grown Puffer Fish


     

    Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

    As a cob and meer smoker, I don't know much about briars, so forgive the newbie type question. I've got a few estate pipes coming my way, some of which have been restored, which often means that the bowls have been reamed back to the wood. Does this basically mean starting at day one as far as seasoning the pipe goes? If break in is all about building cake, then I guess it does -- but is that what the break in process is about? Or is it more complicated, involving burning away sap or whatever from the briar?

    Basically, is it really the same to break in a new pipe and a well restored estate?
    If I could write poetry, I'd be a poet. I can't, so I smoke a pipe instead ....

  2. #2

    True Derelict Fuzzy's Avatar


     

    Re: Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

    A well restored estate pipe should have some cake. At no time would/should a pipe be reamed to bare wood (IMHO).

    I once had an over reamed pipe that just would not smoke well. I built up a carbon cake by wiping corn syrup inside the bowl before smoking and the sugar made a decent cake. It is now in my couple of times a month rotation.
    I don't always drink beer,,,
    OK, yes I do

  3. #3

    Leading Puffer Fish ChronoB's Avatar


     

    Re: Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

    Don't sweat it. You know how you build cake? By smoking it. Smoke, and don't worry.

  4. #4

    Elder Puffer Fish Leader MarkC's Avatar


     

    Re: Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

    And, to answer the question you'll be asking a year from now, no, there is no way to stop cake from forming...
    ********.com

  5. #5

    Sot-weed Bohemian freestoke's Avatar


     

    Re: Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkC View Post
    And, to answer the question you'll be asking a year from now, no, there is no way to stop cake from forming...
    Grass is to cake as lawnmower is to reamer.
    Vegetarian -- that's an old Indian word meaning "lousy hunter". -- Andy Rooney

  6. #6

    Evolving Lead Puffer Fish Andrewdk's Avatar


     

    Re: Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

    Some restorers do ream back pretty far, you'll know when you get them if there's cake or not. Post up a pic when they arrive if you're not sure.
    The land of milk and honey, a safe haven and the last bastion of freedom - http://www.tobaccocellar.com/andrewdk

  7. #7

    Full grown Puffer Fish


     

    Re: Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

    Hehe. Okay, I get the picture. Maybe I'll doing it by loading up the new pipe and one of my meers as well. I'll smoke a few puffs of the briar, then turn to the meer while I'm waiting for it to cool. Seriously, I've never smoked a new briar, only filthy, grubby estates that I cleaned up myself.

    At no time would/should a pipe be reamed to bare wood (IMHO).


    Seems like a lot of restorers like to do it that way, though. Dave from Walker Briar Works says:

    “Full Pipe Restoration” means making a pipe like brand new, including the need to break the pipe in as was needed when it was brand new.

    I think Smoking Pipes sells estates like that, too. Some of the ebay sellers who specialize in pipes obviously have it down, buy old pipes, buff 'em, polish the stems, ream 'em, put a bit of olive oil on before you photograph them and you can 40 bucks to the price. I read a thread on this forum, some people say they like it, you start all over from scratch, some people like it where you can avoid the growing pain. Well, I've got a few pipes coming from different sources, some uncared for, some restored. Guess I'll work something out. Still got me cobs and me meers if it all ends in tears.
    If I could write poetry, I'd be a poet. I can't, so I smoke a pipe instead ....

  8. #8

    I'm watching you.


     

    Re: Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

    I heard a bit of honey in a new bowl works as well as corn syrup?
    "Only fine cigars are worth smoking, and only men who smoke fine cigars are worth kissing." -Joan Collins

  9. #9

    Evolving Lead Puffer Fish RupturedDuck's Avatar


     

    Re: Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

    Quote Originally Posted by jphank View Post
    I heard a bit of honey in a new bowl works as well as corn syrup?
    So does smoking a pipe without a bit of honey or corn syrup in the bottom of your bowl. So, why would you put that in it?

    RD

  10. #10

    Puffer Fish with many spikes johnb's Avatar


     

    Re: Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

    I smoke every pipe the same on the first bowl as I do on the 500th, i pack a full bowl and smoke, i dont personally subscribe to honey thing, even though savinelli reccomends it in their instructions

  11. #11

    Young Fish


     

    Re: Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

    I don't like adding anything aside from tobacco into my bowls. If you really want to build cake up fast, get some basic burley blends. Prince Albert works for me, I just smoke a bowl, pack another without dumping, smoke again, and do this for awhile and it cakes right up fast.

  12. #12

    Snuff-hound steinr1's Avatar


     

    Re: Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

    Quote Originally Posted by Irfan View Post
    As a cob and meer smoker, I don't know much about briars, so forgive the newbie type question. I've got a few estate pipes coming my way, some of which have been restored, which often means that the bowls have been reamed back to the wood. Does this basically mean starting at day one as far as seasoning the pipe goes? If break in is all about building cake, then I guess it does -- but is that what the break in process is about? Or is it more complicated, involving burning away sap or whatever from the briar?

    Basically, is it really the same to break in a new pipe and a well restored estate?
    Reviving this old thread, because I'm interested in the views on this...

    Personally, I do ream back to the wood where at all possible. I like the cake on my pipes to be MY cake. It does sometimes lead to the bowl being a bit of an odd shape internally - due to material loss from carbonizing of the wood (poor smoking habits of the previous owner IMHO) - but I then attempt to get things back in shape with judicious paring back of the cake as it builds. This is done by simply using the pipe as normal. The cake will come.

    I've also heard that gentle smoking of a new pipe is needed to ensure that stresses in the wood are allowed to be released without cracks forming. With an estate pipe that shouldn't be needed.

    Sap and other unwanted "stuff" in the wood should never need to be smoked out of a pipe when new. The process of maturing the briar is there to remove everything before you get to it. The obvious exception is the Dunhill process (now other manufacturers too?) where oils are used to "season" the pipe. I'm really not convinced by this. Although their pipes are obviously produced to a very high quality (and price), it sounds to me like a "cheap" alternative to using good quality, well seasoned wood. Really good quality pipes are 50 years plus in the making from digging the roots to final polish. My personal hobbyhorse. I've had one Dunhill (practically free - charity shop fare, but good condition) and I wasn't impressed. I loved it so much that it's now been lost and I don't mourn it.

    But all of this is clearly secondary to your overall aim. To produce a pipe that meets your personal aesthetics and works well. I love a well l presented pipe, but one of my most used pipes is split and with weird internal shape (an "interesting" side comment is that malt whisky makers reproduce the dents in their copper stills if they need replacement; they won't risk changes to the shape affecting the taste). But it smokes extremely well and the grain (where the cracks allow it to shine through) is lovely. Next job on this one is bind it with copper wire to prevent its total disintegration.
    "Never keep up with the Joneses. Drag them down to your level." - Quentin Crisp

  13. #13

    Midlife crises Puffer mcgreggor57's Avatar


     

    Re: Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

    Quote Originally Posted by steinr1 View Post
    ...Next job on this one is bind it with copper wire to prevent its total disintegration.
    Duct tape
    Tobacco Cellar: http://www.tobaccocellar.com/mcgreggor57
    Never trust a woman's tears or a dog's limp.

  14. #14

    True Derelict Fuzzy's Avatar


     

    Re: Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

    Quote Originally Posted by mcgreggor57 View Post
    Duct tape
    Thanks for the laugh!
    I don't always drink beer,,,
    OK, yes I do

  15. #15

    Snuff-hound steinr1's Avatar


     

    Re: Breaking in a new ... estate pipe?

    Quote Originally Posted by mcgreggor57 View Post
    Duct tape
    Fantastic stuff. I go nowhere without it!

    And there is no motorcycle you can't dismantle with vice-grip pliers, a cold chisel and a big hammer. Putting them back together is a different matter. Although I have seen many a Triumph that looked (leaked) like it had...
    "Never keep up with the Joneses. Drag them down to your level." - Quentin Crisp


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •